City to offer tips on getting hired at Remington & Toyota

Two career-readiness seminars will be held soon in Huntsville to help job seekers find work at Remington Outdoor, Toyota and the Huntsville Police Department.

Remington announced in February it will create 2,000 jobs over 10 years at its new gun plant in the former Chrysler building near Huntsville International Airport. Three months later, Toyota launched an education-to-work initiative with Calhoun Community College to close the gap of unfilled skilled technician jobs across the state.

Just last week, the city said it will take applications through July 31 for its next police academy class. Full-time Huntsville Police officers make between $38,188 and $58,302 on average.

A “What it Takes” seminar will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. July 29 in the Dr. Richard Showers Recreation Center Community Room at 4600 Blue Springs Road. Ken Smiley, Alabama Industrial Development Training project manager, will discuss how to land a job at Remington, while Bethany Shockney will give details about the new FAME program between Calhoun and Toyota.

The Huntsville Police Department also will present information about applying for the 54th Huntsville Police Academy.

A “Taking Action” resume writing and interviewing class will take place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Aug. 5 with Alabama Career Center Manager Mike Fowler.

How to Repackage Military Skills on a Resume to Attract Civilian Employers

http://www.careerattraction.com/how-to-repackage-military-skills-on-a-resume-to-attract-civilian-employers/

We’vRepackaging Military Skills How to Repackage Military Skills on a Resume to Attract Civilian Employerse all heard that unemployment is a serious problem in the U.S. However, for our country’s servicemen and women who are in the process of transitioning out of the military to resume their lives in the civilian world, the situation is worse.

With July 2013 unemployment numbers showing 7.7% for post 9/11 veterans (above the national average of 7.4%), military veterans continue to struggle to find jobs. But in addition to entering or re-entering a really tight job market, they also face the added challenge of positioning their military skills and experience onto a resume that gets the attention of civilian employers.

For example, someone who served as a gunner’s mate—responsible for operating and maintaining missile launching systems, rocket launchers and other ordnance systems and equipment—would probably have a tough time describing how their skills could benefit a prospective employer.

Yet if you think about it, a gunner’s mate has to be analytic and detail-oriented. They need to be problem-solvers, strategic thinkers and good at training and supervising crews. In addition, the job demands a high comfort level with operating and maintaining machinery. All of these skills are easily transferable to today’s job market and desired by many employers.

So the challenge, then, becomes figuring out how to extract the desirable experience and qualifications gained in the military and repackage them to impress prospective employers.

 

What Skills Are Employers Looking For?

The first question to answer when applying for a position is: How can I make this employer see and believe that I have the skills to fill this position and bring value to the company, especially as a result of my time in the service?

The answer will depend on the kind of position you’re applying for and the specific skills required for that job. For example, the gunner’s mate mentioned earlier–or sailors who served on ships or submarines–could talk about their mechanical and technical talents and their ability to learn quickly how machinery and mechanical systems work.

Another example may be technicians trained in radar systems, high tech communications or cryptography, who could cite that experience and relate it to today’s information and digital technology. Personnel involved in military recruiting, training and public affairs can easily adapt their communications, organization and management skills to the civilian world of sales and marketing positions, public relations, trade associations and non-profit organizations. And service members involved in construction, welding, electrical work or facility maintenance and repair services can describe how their experience gave them specific knowledge and skills that would be useful in the building trades, repair and installation work and plant maintenance.

The point is to make the job application and resume stand out from the crowd by communicating how your military experience and past employment history can be of value in fulfilling the company’s needs and the requirements of the position.

 

What Qualities Do Employers Look For in Candidates?

In addition to work experience, there are personality traits that many employers also desire. Traits associated with military veterans—such as being responsible, disciplined, dedicated and hardworking—are highly desired by employers. (Click here to tweet this thought.)

A quick review of classified ads and online job sites reveals some of the general character traits and attitudes employers are seeking in job applicants. Here are some key phrases frequently seen in job descriptions and ways you can use them in your application, resume or interview:

  • Hardworking, motivated – Highlight examples of a strong work ethic and the desire to succeed.
  • Disciplined, reliable – Communicate that you are serious about the job, are willing to do what needs to be done and will follow through even when faced with setbacks.
  • Team player – Convey that you are able to work cooperatively with coworkers, follow direction and also lead the team when called upon.
  • Can-do attitude – Display self-confidence and a positive attitude in presenting your skills and experience and answering any question.

Ask any employer, and they’ll tell you that a positive attitude, honesty, integrity, commitment and a willingness to do what it takes to perform the job well are major factors in their hiring decisions. Whether it’s in sales, construction, manufacturing, technology or any other industry, knowing how to position your skills and experience, combined with a great attitude, can help land you on an employer’s hiring shortlist.

Resources for Veterans

Combined Insurance is committed to helping veterans transition into the civilian workforce. We work closely with the Transition Assistance Program (TAP), a partnership among the Department of Defense, Veterans Affairs and the Department of Labor’s Veterans’ Employment and Training Service.

TAP was established to meet the needs of servicemen and women transitioning out of the military and into civilian life by offering job search assistance and workshops, support and counsel. Combined Insurance participates in TAP classes to help transitioning servicemen and women translate their military experience, re-purpose their skills and revise their resumes to help make them more attractive to civilian employers.

We consider it an honor and privilege to serve those who have served our country. Be sure to watch for upcoming posts, where we’ll discuss choosing a career and brushing up on interview skills.

 How to Repackage Military Skills on a Resume to Attract Civilian Employers

Peter Leighton is Senior Vice President of Recruiting for Combined Insurance, a leading provider of individual supplemental insurance products and part of the ACE Group of Companies. Combined Insurance is a participant in several military veteran career recruitment programs and plans to hire 1,000 vets.

10-Step Personal Branding Worksheet

There’s a lot of talk about “personal branding” when it comes to job searches. “You need to brand yourself,” they say. “Distinguish yourself from your competition with your brand.” But what exactly is personal branding and how do you go about developing your own? This article by Meg Guiseppi from Job-Hunt.org does a great job explaining what a personal brand is and gives you the right questions to ask yourself in order to develop your own, unique brand to help you through your job search AND includes links other resources. (Original article: http://www.job-hunt.org/personal-branding/personal-branding-worksheet.shtml):

Your personal brand is more than the brand statement you use as your elevator pitch when you introduce yourself in real-life encounters or to market yourself in your paper, digital, and online career marketing communications (resume, bio, Linkedin profile, website, etc.).

Your brand is your reputation – the perception of you held by the external world. It is the combination of personal attributes, values, drivers, strengths, and passions you draw from that differentiates your unique promise of value from your peers, and helps those assessing you determine if they should hire you or do business with you.

You need to identify those qualities and characteristics within you and communicate a crystal clear, consistent message across multiple channels – online and offline – designed to resonate with your target audience.

I’d like to take you deeper into defining your brand than I did in my earlier Job-Hunt article, Creating Your Authentic Personal Brand Statement.

I developed the following 10 brand assessment and defining exercises based on my training as a Reach Certified Personal Branding Strategist, and use them as I guide my clients through executive brand development. Be prepared to devote time to this. In the end, I think you’ll find your efforts eye-opening and invigorating.

1. What are your vision and purpose?

Look externally at the bigger picture of your vision for the world, and then internally at how you might help the world realize your vision.

Think about one world problem you would like to see solved or one area of life that you want to see transformed or improved. This is your vision.

What role might you play in making your vision happen? This is your purpose.

2. What are your values?

Your values are your guiding principles – things like:

Balance, being the best, agility, calmness, challenge, decisiveness, perseverance, drive, honesty, integrity, pragmatism, sensitivity, structure, teamwork, sharing, vitality, zeal.

3. What are your passions?

What do you most enjoy doing – in your personal life and work life? Think about the activities, interests, or conversational topics that fascinate and energize you. Your passions make you get out of bed at 6 a.m. on a Saturday morning or get you talking enthusiastically with others. How do your passions converge with what you are best at doing?

4. What are your top goals for the next year, 2 years, and 5 years?

Work on projecting what you intend to accomplish so you can put together a strategic action plan to get there.

5. What are your top brand attributes.

What 3 or 4 adjectives best describe the value you offer? What words do you use to define your personality? Once you pinpoint what you feel are the right kinds of words, it’s a good idea to consult a thesaurus to precisely nail the exact words. Here are some possibilities, but don’t limit yourself to these:

Collaborative, resilient, forward-focused, risk-taking, connected, international, visionary, diplomatic, intuitive, precise, enterprising, ethical, genuine, accessible.

6. What are your core strengths or motivated skills?

In what functions and responsibilities do you excel? For what things are you the designated “go-to” person? What gap would your company be faced with if you left suddenly? The possibilities are endless, but here are a few suggestions:

Analyzing, collaborating, leading, delegating, empowering others, forecasting, crunching numbers, anticipating risk, mentoring, visioning, selling, innovating, managing conflict, defining needs, writing, listening, communicating.

7. Get feedback from those who know you best – at work, at home, anywhere.

The true measure of your brand is the reputation others hold of you in their hearts and minds. Notice how they introduce you to others. Ask them what your top brand attributes and core strengths are. How does your self-assessment jibe with their feedback?

The 360° Reach Personal Brand Assessment, a confidential, web-based tool that collects anonymous 360-degree feedback in real time from your choice of respondents, is a good option to accomplish this step and the basic account is free.

8. Do a SWOT analysis (Strengths – Weaknesses – Opportunities – Threats).

Strengths and weaknesses are internal, and speak to your potential value to an employer. Opportunities and threats are external, and help you foresee what you’re facing in next career steps.

SWOT is an invaluable personal branding exercise that also helps prepare you for interviewing and future career growth and stability.

[More on SWOT analysis for your career.]

9. Who is your target audience?

Determine where you want to fit in (kind of job position and industry). Learn what decision makers in that field are looking for when they’re assessing candidates. Create your personal brand messaging around what keywords and content will attract them. Find out where those decision makers hang out, position yourself in front of them, and capture their attention.

10. Who is your competition in the marketplace and what differentiates you from them?

What do the people competing for the same jobs as you typically have to offer? What is it about you that makes you the best hiring choice? What added value do you bring to the table that no one else does?

Bottom Line

The work involved in uncovering and defining your personal brand may seem daunting, but your efforts will benefit you immeasurably. In job search, defining and communicating your personal brand can help pre-qualify you as a good fit and strategically position you to land your next great gig faster.

 

About this author…

Meg Guiseppi, Job-Hunt’s Personal Branding Expert and 20+ year careers industry veteran, has earned 10 certifications, including Reach Certified Personal Branding Strategist, Reach Social Branding Analyst – LinkedIn Profile Strategist, and Certified Executive Resume Master.Meg is the author of “23 Ways You Sabotage Your Executive Job Search and How Your Brand Will Help You Land.” Connect with Meg at ExecutiveCareerBrand.com for c-suite personal branding and executive job search help and on Google+ and Twitter (@MegGuiseppi).

Five Things to Bring to the Career Fair & More

Original article from Military.com

Empowering Our Veterans 5-17-13 (195)

career fair is a great place to gather information about potential employers and make contacts that can lead to your first job. Here’s some advice on how to make the most of your time.

Five Things to Bring to the Career Fair

1. Copies of your resume (25 to 40 depending on the size of the event). Be sure it represents your knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) effectively. It needs to look professional — easy to read format on plain white or cream-colored paper — and be free of typos. If you are looking at several career options, you may want to have two or more targeted resumes with different career objectives!

2. A smile, a strong handshake, and a positive attitude. First impressions are important. Approach an employer, smile, and offer your hand when you introduce yourself.

3. A 30-second “sales pitch.” Hand the recruiter a copy of your resume and be prepared to expand on it quickly! Share basic information about yourself and your career interests like this: “Hello, I’m Carrie Jones. I’m a senior here at Wonderful University and I’m majoring in English. I’m very interested in a marketing career. As you can see on my resume, I just completed an internship in the Marketing Division of the ABC Company in Peoria. I’ve also taken some courses in business marketing. I’m very interested in talking with you about marketing opportunities with your organization.”

4. Information about the organizations that will be attending.Gather information as you would for a job interview. To maximize the brief time you have with each employer, you need to know how your skills and interests match their needs. And don’t just concentrate on the “big names.” There are often great opportunities with companies with which you are not familiar.

5. Energy! Career fairs require you to be on your feet moving from table to table for an hour or so. Each time you meet someone, be at your best, as refreshed as possible!

Five Things Not to Do at the Career Fair

1. Don’t cruise the booths with a group of friends. Interacting with the recruiters on your own. Make your own positive impression!

2. Don’t carry your backpack, large purse, or other paraphernalia with you. Carry your resume in a professional-looking portfolio or small briefcase works well. It will keep your resume neat and handy, and gives you a place to file business cards of recruiters that you meet. Usually you can stow your coat, backpack, or other gear in a coatroom.

3. Don’t come dressed for rugby practice (or any other extremely casual activity). A career fair is a professional activity — perhaps your first contact with a future employer.

4. Don’t “wing it” with employers. Do your homework! Research the companies just as you would for an interview. You’ll be able to focus on why you want to work for the organization and what you can do for them.

5. Don’t come during the last half hour of the event. Many employers come a long distance to attend the fair and may need to leave early. If you come late, you may miss the organizations you wanted to contact

Five Things to Take Home From the Career Fair

1. Business cards from the recruiters you have met. Use the cards to write follow-up notes to those organizations in which you are most interested.

2. Notes about contacts you made. Take paper and pen with you to write down important details about particular organizations, including names of people who may not have had business cards. Take a few minutes after you leave each table to jot down these notes!

3. Information about organizations you have contacted. Most recruiters will have information for you to pick up, including company brochures, computer diskettes or CD’s, position descriptions, and other data. You won’t have time to deal with these at the fair!

4. A better sense of your career options. If you have used the event correctly, you will have made contact with several organizations that hire people with your skills and interests. In thinking about their needs and your background, evaluate whether each company might be a match for you.

5. Self-confidence in interacting with employer representatives.A career fair gives you the opportunity to practice your interview skills in a less formidable environment than a formal interview. Use this experience to practice talking about what you have done, what you know, and what your interests are.

Top 4 Things TAP Class Didn’t Teach Me

Article on GI Jobs.com by Bri on May 2, 2014 (http://www.gijobs.com/top-4-things-tap-class-didnt-teach-me/)

Things I didn't learn in TAP Class

There I was – four-year contract fulfilled, gear turned in, terminal leave submitted. All that stood between me and civilian freedom was one more round of mandatory fun – TAP class.

Sure, it lived it up to my expectations; kept me away from my unit for a couple of days, I got to wear civilian clothes, and on most days we were released by 1500. But it fell a little short on its Uncle Sam’s given purpose of preparing transitioning veterans for the civilian workforce.

Resume? Got it. Mock Interview skills? Nailed ‘em. Having the stamina and brain capacity to survive a 3,846 slide powerpoint presentation, should I ever have to encounter such hell in the civilian world? Golden. But, believe it or not, there were still a few things those government bureaucrats left out when they wrote the TAP curriculum. Over the past two years of my post-military career, I’ve gathered a few things TAP class didn’t prepare me for.

Vacation Days Do Not Equal Leave Days

To say the military is demanding of our time is probably the understatement of a lifetime. So surprisingly, the number one thing I had completely taken advantage of was the amount of time we actually got off. There are no “four-days” in the civilian world. There’s no sick call. There’s no buddy on staff duty to sign you out. Any time spent away from work is counted against you, and it adds up quick.

It’s Not as Easy as 1, 2, 3

TAP curriculum, like most military directive, is cut and dry. You’re told to follow steps A, B, and C, and you’re expected to get D as a result. Military transition isn’t the fairytale TAP can paint it to be. You might have a pristine resume and the shiniest dress shoes in interview rooms across America, but that, combined with your veteran status does not guarantee a perfect military exit strategy. Be prepared to figure out a plan E.

You Need to Get Paid More Than You Think

There is a brief chapter in TAP on civilian salary negotiation. PAY ATTENTION. You can easily underestimate the value of BAH, special duty pays, healthcare costs, etc… There’s a good chance you’ll end up in a jam because you accepted a salary that can’t handle your cost of living.

HOOAH!? – Not Quite

Unless you’re lucky enough to find an employer who is overly passionate about the daily morale of its employees (in which case, stay put), you’re not going to have the inspirational speeches, blood pumping cadences, or the in-your-face motivation you’re used to. Be prepared to dig deep for your own workplace enthusiasm.

It’s not a surprise civilian life is drastically different than that in the military. The government wouldn’t spend millions of dollars on TAP to prepare you for the transition if it wasn’t. Use the advice above, similar articles on gijobs.com, and the valuable information TAP does teach you, and you’ll be well on your way to post-military success – where there’s a lot of fun, and none of it’s ‘mandatory’.

Empowerment Through Employment Job Fair for Professionals with Disabilities

North Alabama Society for Human Resource ManagementNorth Alabama Society for Human Resource Management (NASHRM) is conducting a job fair called “Empowerment Through Employment” that is specifically designed for professionals and Veterans with disabilities. The event will be held on Thursday, July 24, 2014 at the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (3000 Johnson Road, Huntsville, AL).

There will be REAL employment opportunities. HR Representatives from participating companies will be present to screen and hire potential candidates. Applications will be taken from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm. Interview coaching and opportunities to print your resume will also be available.

Be sure to come dressed for success and bring your resume on a flash drive if you wish to have it printed at the event.

If you are interested in participating please contact workforcereadiness@nashrm.org for more information and to register.

SMD Symposium & Warriors to the Workforce Hiring Event

PrintYou are hereby invited to participate in the Warriors To The Workforce Hiring Event presented by SourceAmerica™ in association with Still Serving Veterans to be held in conjunction with the 2014 Space and Missile Defense (SMD) Symposium on August 12-13, 2014. This one of a kind event is part of the American Freedom Foundation’s nationwide initiative to help veterans find jobs. The event will bring together major companies from throughout the country to profile their services and provide employment opportunities for our veterans over the two- day period. Attending veterans will have the chance to talk with employers, submit qualifications, and even participate in job interviews on the spot.

Download full information packet FOR JOB SEEKERS here

Download full information packet FOR EMPLOYERS here

Facts 2014 SMD Symposium
  • The 2014 theme is “Space and Missile Defense: Foundational to US Strategy Today and in the Future.” Key features of this year’s symposium include the following: Technology Track highlighting emerging technologies – 2014 topic is Modeling & Simulation
  • STEM Education Forum – free to the general public (Tuesday afternoon; Outreach program Thursday)
  • GEO spatial intelligence program (Wednesday)
  • AFF’s Warriors To The Workforce Hiring Event (Tuesday and Wednesday)
  • Presentations from Senior Level National and International Leaders
  • Congressional and Technology Panels
  • Wednesday evening dinner: confirmed guest U.S. Representative Mike Rogers from Michigan’s 8th congressional district
  • Exhibit Hall featuring Technology and Product Demonstrations

 

Info for Veterans

Registration link for Veterans, Transitioning Military Service Members, Spouses, Volunteers and Individuals Working at Exhibitor Booths: http://www.map-­dynamics.com/clients/smdconf/register2.php

  • Veteran’s admission is free;
  • All veterans, military transitioning service members; spouses must have an SMD Symposium Badge to enter Warriors To The Workforce Hiring Event and Exhibit Hall.
  • Please go to http://www.map-dynamics.com/clients/smdconf/register2.php to register to receive your badge.
  • Arrival Information for Veterans: Upon your arrival, please check in at the SMD Symposium check-­‐in area and get your badge and then proceed to Ballroom #5 for the Warriors To The Workforce Hiring Event.
  • Be prepared to meet employers;
  • Dress for success;
  • Bring enough resumes (Both private and government);
  • Peruse websites for housing, parking, directions, etc.;
  • Peruse websites of participating companies to get an idea of job availability and descriptions.

 

Hiring Event Daily Agenda

0845 Exhibitor set-­‐up and registration

0945 Opening remarks & welcomes (Ballroom #5)

1300 Break for lunch (exhibit booths remain open)

1700 Exhibitor break down/end

 

Info for Exhibitors
  • Companies and/or organizations ONLY should register at http://bit.ly/1ut9tht and pay associated fees.
  • Individuals working the exhibitor booths SHOULD NOT register on this site.
  • All individuals working the exhibitor booths must have an SMD Symposium Badge to enter Warriors To The Workforce Hiring Event and Exhibit Hall.
  • Please go to http://www.map-dynamics.com/clients/smdconf/register2.php to register to receive your individual badge.
  • Arrival Information for Exhibitors: When you arrive on the first day of the event, please check in at the SMD Symposium check-­in area and get your badge and then proceed to Ballroom #5 and check in with the American Freedom Foundation to find out where to set up your area.
  • Exhibitor pricing listed herein are per day prices and include two people to work the booth each day;
  • Due to space restrictions, we will only accommodate enough companies over the two-­day period to fill 20 exhibit spaces each day;
  • A company can reserve space for 1 – 2 days of the event;
  • Each participating company must have job descriptions available.
  • Each exhibitor will receive 18ft. table and 2 chairs. Please plan to bring your own tablecloth.

 

Exhibitor Pricing and Benefits

One Day Exhibitor $325

Benefits:

2 Day Exhibitors save 15% or $552.50

 

Conference Websites:

 

Sponsorship Levels and Benefits

Sponsorship Levels Amount: Sponsorship Level I $5,000

Benefits:

  • All of the benefits for Level I Exhibitor, plus recognition in all signage as Warriors To The Workforce Event Sponsor

Sponsorship Level II $10,000

Benefits:

  • All of the benefits for Sponsorship Level I, plus
  • Inclusion in all media relating to promotion of event and all event printed materials and signage as Presenting Sponsor

Sponsorship Level III $15,000

Benefits:

  • All of the benefits for Sponsorship Level I, plus
  • Inclusion in all media relating to promotion of event and all event printed materials and signage as Title Sponsor
This event would not be possible without the support and efforts of the following organizations:

About American Freedom Foundation

In return for their service and sacrifices made for our country, the American Freedom Foundation believes veterans, military service members, and their families are deserving of support that empowers and enables them to lead confident and productive lives. AFF serves and supports them by building awareness and understanding of their service, sacrifice and needs through partnerships with military focused organizations and always will be relentlessly driven to bettering the lives of these heroes and their families. Throughout its short history, the American Freedom Foundation has made grants of approximately $1.2 million to more than 30 military organizations and awarded scholarships to military spouses and their dependents through the AFF/Kaplan University scholarship program valued in excess of $5 million. Through the AFF national veteran’s employment initiative program, Warriors To The Workforce, 1000′s of Veterans have been connected to 100′s of participating companies for civilian employment opportunities. http://www.americanfreedomfoundation.org

 

About Space and Missile Defense Symposium

The SMD Symposium is the leading educational, professional development and networking event in the space and missile defense community. The symposium is widely attended by leaders and professionals from the United States and our allies around the world. It is the ideal forum for conducting business face‐to‐face. Participants can also earn continuing education credits. The 2014 theme is “Space and Missile Defense: Foundational to US Strategy Today and in the Future.” http://smdsymposium.org

 

About SourceAmerica™

SourceAmerica™ is a national nonprofit that creates job opportunities for a skilled and dedicated workforce: people with significant disabilities. We are the vital link between this exceptional workforce, the network of community-­‐based nonprofits, and the Federal government and commercial companies that need the products and services they provide. SourceAmerica is an AbilityOne® authorized enterprise. www.sourceamerica.org

 

About Still Serving Veterans

Still Serving Veterans (SSV) is an Alabama‐based Veterans’ service organization that empowers Veterans, wounded warriors and their families to optimally transition into meaningful new careers and post-military lives with all the benefits and services that they have earned. Founded in 2006, SSV has served more than 10,000 Veterans and their families nationally. Since 2007, SSV has secured over $78 million in additional benefits, services, and salaries for their one‐on‐one case managed Veteran clients. SSV is recognized nationally as well as a center of excellence for Veterans reintegration and optimization of Veteran services. http://www.stillservingveterans.org

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